- Indonesian Textiles: Tenun & Ikat -

196 Pin162 Pengikut
Indonesia, Bali ~ Weaver, 1910

Indonesia, Bali ~ Weaver, 1910

sumatra songket-weaving

sumatra songket-weaving

Woman displays Ikat weaving

Woman displays Ikat weaving

Songket - Songket is a fabric that belongs to the brocade family of textiles of Indonesia, Malaysia, and Brunei. It is hand-woven in silk or cotton, and intricately patterned with gold or silver threads. The metallic threads stand out against the background cloth to create a shimmering effect.    Photo by Hafiz Ismail

Songket - Songket is a fabric that belongs to the brocade family of textiles of Indonesia, Malaysia, and Brunei. It is hand-woven in silk or cotton, and intricately patterned with gold or silver threads. The metallic threads stand out against the background cloth to create a shimmering effect. Photo by Hafiz Ismail

The making of Kain Tenun,  Flores, Indonesia

The making of Kain Tenun, Flores, Indonesia

Balinese weaver, 1930s, photographer unknown.

Balinese weaver, 1930s, photographer unknown.

Ann Street Studio- Jean shows us one of the steps in the Balinese tie-dying process called ikat (meaning “to tie a knot”) on the right with the finished result on the left. All of the patterns are hand tied and repeatedly dyed through a very long and time consuming process.

Ann Street Studio- Jean shows us one of the steps in the Balinese tie-dying process called ikat (meaning “to tie a knot”) on the right with the finished result on the left. All of the patterns are hand tied and repeatedly dyed through a very long and time consuming process.

A weaver in Matabesi Biboki, West Timor. The weaver ties one end of her loom to a wall, a tree, or stakes driven into the ground, loops a strap or a wooden yoke behind her back, and leans forward and back to control the tension of her loom. If the tension is uneven, the cloth will slant as she weaves. Backstrap looms are portable and easy to store, and are often made at home.

A weaver in Matabesi Biboki, West Timor. The weaver ties one end of her loom to a wall, a tree, or stakes driven into the ground, loops a strap or a wooden yoke behind her back, and leans forward and back to control the tension of her loom. If the tension is uneven, the cloth will slant as she weaves. Backstrap looms are portable and easy to store, and are often made at home.

Ikat from Raijua, Savu Group, Indonesia

Ikat from Raijua, Savu Group, Indonesia

Batak Ritual Cloth (Ulos-Ragidup), Sumatra, Indonesia, 19th C

Batak Ritual Cloth (Ulos-Ragidup), Sumatra, Indonesia, 19th C

Pinterest
Cari