Aramaic alphabet

Aramaic alphabet “Hebrew writing and Arabic writing go from east to west, Latin writing, from west to east. Languages are like cats: You must not stroke their hair the wrong way.

Aramaic (ארמית, Arāmît): The Aramaic alphabet was adaptaed from the Phoenician alphabet during the 8th century BC and was used to write the Aramaic language until about 600 AD. The Aramaic alphabet was adapted to write quite a few other languages, and developed into a number of new alphabets, including the Hebrew square script and cursive script, Nabataean, Syriac, Palmyrenean, Mandaic, Sogdian, Mongolian and probably the Old Turkic script. (...)

Aramaic (ארמית, Arāmît): The Aramaic alphabet was adaptaed from the Phoenician alphabet during the century BC and was used to write the Aramaic language until about 600 AD.

Alef-Bet Héber sírkövekkel kapcsolatos tudnivalók. Zsidó naptár

Hebrew Alef Bet (alphabet) with a little gematria on the side. Every Hebrew letter has a much deeper meaning behind it than how to speak the word. The language of the Creator!

ARAMAIC  The Aramaic language was the international trade language of the ancient Middle East between 1000 and 600 BCE, spoken from the Mediterranean coast to the borders of India. Its script, derived from Phoenician and first attested during the 9th century BCE, also became extremely popular and was adopted by many people with or without any previous writing system

ARAMAIC The Aramaic language was the international trade language of the ancient Middle East between 1000 and 600 BCE, spoken from the Mediterranean coast to the borders of India. Its script, derived from Phoenician and first attested during the cent

The Syriac Aramaic Alphabet.  First noted was the Estrangelo script (called Estrangela in the Chaldean Churches) in the manuscripts of St. Ephrem of Edessa, Syria.  Geographic differentiation produced a second script of Western Syriac called Serto, a simplified writing form of Estrangelo for the Antiochene Churches, and a third script of Eastern Syriac known as Madnhaya for the Chaldean Churches.  A fourth Syriac script known as Karshuni (or Garshuni) was later employed for copying Arabic…

The Syriac Aramaic Alphabet. First noted was the Estrangelo script (called…

The Syriac alphabet developed from the Aramaic alphabet and was used mainly to write the Syriac language from about the 2nd century BC. There are a number of different forms of the Syriac alphabet: Esṭrangelā (ܐܣܛܪܢܓܠܐ), Serṭā (ܣܪܛܐ) and Madnḥāyā (ܡܕܢܚܝܐ). (...)

Details of the Syriac alphabet and the Syriac/Aramaic language, which is spoken by about people in Iraq, Syria, Iran and a number of other countries.

Alphabets hébreu et grec. Greek and Hebrew Alphabets with Numeric Values

Greek and Hebrew alphabets with numeric equivalents. Many Old Religion spells incorporate various numerical values in their text.

Syriac is a dialect of Middle Aramaic that was once spoken across much of the Fertile Crescent. Having first appeared as a script in the 1st century AD after being spoken as an unwritten language for five centuries, Classical Syriac became a major literary language throughout the Middle East from the 4th to the 8th centuries, the classical language of Edessa, preserved in a large body of Syriac literature. Syriac is a Middle Aramaic language.

Syriac, Aramaic, and Mandaic: Learn One Language, Three Dialects, For The Price Of Five Alphabets

colleenrants: “ “The Syriac alphabet is a writing system primarily used to write the Syriac language from the century AD. It is one of the Semitic abjads descending from the Aramaic alphabet through the Palmyrene alphabet, and shares similarities.

Ancient Scripts: Aramaic

The Aramaic Alphabets

As with each of our other studies, we'll now substitute the ancient Hebrew pictographic letters for the modern Aramaic Square Script letters, and see what kind of mnemonic meanings emerge. Description from graceloveobey.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

Ancient Hebrew pictographic letters compared with modern Aramaic Square Script letters

"The Aramaic alphabet is adapted from the Phoenician alphabet and became distinctive from it by the 8th century BCE. The letters all represent consonants, some of which are matres lectionis, which also indicate long vowels."

Bilingual (Greek and Aramaic) edict by Emperor Ashoka from the century BCE was discovered in the southern city of Kandahar.

Earliest known example of Turkic writing found in Kyzyl, early 8th century. The origins of the Turkic scripts are uncertain. The initial guesses were based on visual, external resemblances of the Turkic runiform letters with the Gothic runes or with Greek, Etruscan and Anatolian letters, suggesting an Indo-European Alphabet resembling Semitic Phoenician, Gothic, Phoenician-based Greek, etc. letters. Mainstream opinion derives the Orkhon script from variants of the Aramaic alphabet, in…

Earliest known example of Turkic writing found in Mongolia, early century.

Each letter of Phoenician gave way to a new form in its daughter scripts. Left to right:Latin, Greek, Phoenician, Hebrew, Arabic

Each letter of Phoenician gave way to a new form in its daughter scripts. Left to right: Latin, Greek, Phoenician, Hebrew, Arabic.

50 Hebrew words, many from the Books of Genesis and Exodus in the Law of Moses or Torah. #learnhebrew

50 Hebrew words, many from the Books of Genesis and Exodus in the Law of Moses or Torah. #learnhebrew

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