Hopper

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a painting of an old house in a field
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Edward Hopper (1882-1967), Marshall’s House, 1932. watercolor over graphite on paper
a painting of two people sitting at a table in front of a window looking out onto the city
Il silenzio inquietante di Edward Hopper
two men standing next to boats on the beach
Hopper painting up for auction in Portland
Edward Hopper (1882-1967) “Tredwell’s Folly,”
a painting of an old white house with a black door and window in the grass
Edward Hoppers - Maine Home + Design
an oil painting of trees in a field
Edward Hopper | Canal at Charenton
an oil painting of some rocks in the water
Edward Hopper | (Rocks and Sea)
"Rocks and Sea," Edward Hopper, 1916-19, oil on wood, 11 3/4 × 16 1/16", Whitney Museum of American Art.
a watercolor painting of two large rocks in the desert with trees and bushes around them
Edward Hopper | (Lime Rock Quarry)
VisitExhibitions & EventsArt & ArtistsLearnShopSearchCollectionArtistsEdward Hopper1882–1967
a painting of a barn in the country
edward hopper
a painting of a dog looking out the window at another dog sitting on the porch
Edward Hopper and American Solitude
two women sitting on the porch of a house at night with their reflection in the window
an oil painting of a street scene with buildings and cars under a bridge over water
Edward Hopper Box Factory Gloucester 1928
two nude women sitting on the ground in front of each other, one with her back to the camera
dappledwithshadow
Intercepted by Gravitation | Edward Hopper c.1925
a drawing of a man walking with a backpack on his back and a book in his hand
Edward Hopper made several visits to Europe and Paris, ostensibly to study new art movements, but it is telling that he always maintained that at no point during his visits did he ever hear about his contemporary Picasso. What most impressed him was Rembrandt’s mighty painting The Night Watch (1642).
a drawing of a naked man with his back turned to the side and hands on his hips
Around 1905 Edward Hopper made several visits to Europe and Paris, ostensibly to study new art movements, but it is telling that he always maintained that at no point during his visits did he ever hear about his contemporary Picasso. What most impressed him was Rembrandt’s mighty painting The Night Watch (1642).