Planet Earth

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nalysis of rocks unearthed in Oman that were formed in an ancient ocean around the time of Earth's greatest mass extinction have helped explain why life on Earth took so long to recover. Credit: D. Astratti

Greatest mass extinction driven by acidic oceans, study finds -- ScienceDaily

Halite from the Wieliczka Salt Mine, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Wieliczka, Malopolskie, Poland. Credit: Didier Descouens.

Earth's early atmosphere: Rock salt holds the key to a paradigm shift

On July 5, 2016, the moon passed between NOAA's DSCOVR satellite and Earth. NASA's EPIC camera aboard DSCOVR snapped these images over a period of about four hours. In this set, the far side of the moon, which is never seen from Earth, passes by. In the backdrop, Earth rotates, starting with the Australia and Pacific and gradually revealing Asia and Africa. Credit: NASA/NOAA

A NASA camera on board the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite captured a rare lunar transit across the face of a sunlit Earth. The images, which feature a fully lit far side of the.

A much faster pace of evolution means that species could have proliferated much more rapidly than they do now, affording the flora and fauna of Earth ample time to acquire their enormous diversity and complexity. Credit: © somchaisom / Fotolia

A much faster pace of evolution means that species could have proliferated much more rapidly than they do now, affording the flora and fauna of Earth ample time to acquire their enormous diversity and complexity.

Cutaway of the Earth's surface, down to the liquid core. A numerical convection experiment shows blobs in green, surrounding mantle rock in blue, and former oceanic crust from the surface that has subducted into the interior in yellow. Credit: Dr. Mingming Li/University of Colorado

Giant Blobs of Rock, Deep Inside the Earth, Hold Important Clues About Our Planet -- ScienceDaily Credit: Dr. Mingming Li/University of Colorado

This is an illustration of ancient Earth's magnetic field compared to the modern magnetic field courtesy of Peter Driscoll. Credit: Peter Driscoll

New work from Carnegie's Peter Driscoll suggests Earth's ancient magnetic field was significantly different than the present day field, originating from several poles rather than the familiar two. It is published in Geophysical .

An artwork depicting the decomposition of FeOOH in lower mantle conditions. The cycle starts from ?-FeOOH (blue dot on the top) to its high-pressure form (brown dot), to FeO2 (center crystal) and hydrogen (cyan bubbles), and finally produce other minerals (bubbles on the left side).

Using laboratory techniques to mimic the conditions times normal atmospheric pressure and found deep inside the Earth scientists have identified a form of iron oxide that they believe could explain seismic and geothermal signatures in the deep mantle

This is an illustration of how the diamond anvil cell is used to mimic and study planetary core conditions.

This is an illustration of how the diamond anvil cell is "used to mimic and study planetary core conditions. Earth's magnetic field s.


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