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Crewel Embroidery

Discover Pinterest’s 10 best ideas and inspiration for Crewel Embroidery. Get inspired and try out new things.

Molde Y Videotutorial – Cartera De Tela – Comando Craft

videotutorial comandocraft carteras imaginación utiliza personalizala verlo escova

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#flower embroidery

Hello There!I invite everyone to learn hand embroidery, how to do DIY stitches, Khatli work, Aari work and unique handicraft techniques on my channel. You wi...

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87 Flowers 4 | Sewing Embroidery Designs, Hand Embroidery

87 Flowers 4 | Sewing Embroidery Designs, Hand Embroidery images, similar and related articles aggregated throughout the Internet.

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GRACE: free embroidery pattern

November is coming to an end, so it's time for a lil freebie to make this month a bit more exciting ^^. This time it's the Grace embroidery design that you might already be familiar with from my previous posts. I'm excited to share not only the pattern and stitches I used but also a bit of guidance and tips. Hopefully, it will make the stitching process easier for you! This design features 3 key elements: Rope-looking lines and outlines for the leaves Filling of the leaves Lettering Lines All of the lines are worked in stem stitch. You can see some additional tips on stem stitch in the following posts: Changing direction of stem stitch and the 6 faces of stem stitch. Long story short, as you are stem stitching, keep bringing your needle up to the left of your stitches. This will help you achieve the “rope” appearance of your stem stitch. Given that the direction of lines keeps changing throughout the whole pattern, be careful to not mix up the sides of where the needle should come up. If you are confused, rotate the hoop or embroidery frame so that the line faces upwards and make sure the needle comes up to the left of the line. When I stitched I worked the outline in portions. Let's say I completed 25% of outline first, then filled in some of the leaves, then worked the next 25% of outline and so forth. It helped me to keep a steady path. But, of course, it might be more convenient for you to work it in another way. Maybe you'd like to complete all of the outlines first and only then fill in the leaves. It's completely fine! Decide for yourself the order of working this embroidery pattern and work it in the way that makes you comfortable! I used two strands of floss for the box around the word GRACE, and one strand of floss for the rest of the lines. It made the plant motif look finer and helped the box to stand out. Leaves All of the leaves are filled with the fishbone stitch after the outline is already complete. The leaves are not always conveniently “straight” and with even edges. Their form changes here and there and sometimes they are not complete or cross with other leaves. So, yes, although the fishbone stitch itself is quite easy to pick up on, this design might still present a challenge. As a result, it will be an excellent practice of fishbone stitch for you ;) The order of working the leaves can be whatever you want. Just like with outlining I did it in portions, but it is possible to fill all the leaves with one shade of floss first, and then another and so on. I used two strands of floss when I embroidered the leaves in this pattern. Also, in some places leaves “fold”. These small areas are worked by satin stitch using one strand of floss in the needle. I didn't do any padding here. Just stitched the outline the same way as the areas of the plant motif and covered the “foldings” with parallel satin stitches. Lettering I used an easy and quick approach to lettering for this design. Take two strands of floss and outline a letter in back stitch first. Then “wrap” the letters in satin stitch. Because the letters are not that big and we use two strands of floss, there is no need for any padding. The letters look dimensional enough and pop out of the fabric surface. That's pretty much it. In case you have any questions left, you're always welcome to leave them in the comments below or send me a DM through the contact form :) DOWNLOAD THE FREE PATTERN HERE Have a nice stitching!

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Cabin & Cottage: Photo

Tumblr is a place to express yourself, discover yourself, and bond over the stuff you love. It's where your interests connect you with your people.

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This dog embroidery took over 60 hours and 30 colors to finish!

This embroidery took 60+ hours to complete! Archived from my social media posts 12-04-20. Originally shared on tiktok @stitchingsabbatical LINKS:Website & Sh...

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Stem Stitch Rose with Knotted Center - Tutorial

Today's stitching time was spent playing with a couple of stitches in the company of one of my favorite embroidery books and my doodle cloth. The book is written in Japanese, so I can't make out a word from the instructions, but the photos and diagrams are almost sufficient to understand the stitches. Almost. To make out the rest of the "secrets", there's always the doodle cloth :) There was a cute little flower in the book, starting with some sort of a knot (if you know its proper name, please drop me a note, thank you) that I wanted to try out. Loved the way it turned out, added a few stem stitches to it, and there it was, a lovely, delicate rose, stitched with 6 strands of pink variegated DMC stranded cotton: To stitch this rose first imagine (ha!) a small square, as marked on the photo below. Bring your needle up in 1 and take it down in 2. Come up in 3, and you will get a small straight stitch: The next stitch will not go through the fabric, but under the straight stitch: bring your working thread down over the straight stitch and slide your needle under the straight stitch, pulling to the left of your working thread. Then slide your needle under the straight stitch again, over the working thread, pull your thread through to form a knot and take your needle down in 4 (the upper right corner of our imaginary square). Now you have a lovely knot, which can stand by itself as a small flower, for instance, or as a filling stitch along with French and colonial knots. Or you can take it forward, by bringing your needle up between 3 and 4 (the center of the top line) And making loops by sliding the needle under the little "legs" of the knot and over the working thread (just like stem stitching except not through the fabric) weaving all around the four "legs" When you have woven the fourth leg, you could take your needle down again in the center of the upper line, (just where you came up to make the loops) and you would have a smaller rose, or you could make a bigger rose, by adding more petals - stem stitching around your rose until it gets to the desired size: When you have enough petals, finish your rose by bringing your needle down to the back of the fabric at an angle as shown in the photo below and start making another rose and then another one... Isn't this fun?! Oops, maybe I got a little carried away LOL In the next post I'll show you how I stitched little rose buds, starting with the same knot as the rose and some cute leaves, too. Hope you are having a fun day, Everyone!

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Rosa Andreeva’s Exquisite Embroideries Bring Flowers to Life - Thursd

Modern-day needle-and-thread artist Rosa Andreeva shows how flowers can come to life through threads. Her embroideries makes you want to crawl into her artwork and surround yourself with the flora and fauna on her fabric.

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