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Hand Sewing

Discover Pinterest’s 10 best ideas and inspiration for Hand Sewing. Get inspired and try out new things.

(Image courtesy of http://0.tqn.com/d/diyfashion/) With our focus being upon obtaining a Sewing Kit this week, I thought it would be most helpful to review some basic stiches. (Image courtesy of http://www.sewdresses.com/) Okay, so you see the stitches, when and what do you use them for? Check out these links for more information! http://www.alternative-windows.com/stitches.htm http://cyberseams.com/article/105045/basics/how_to_sew_by_hand_basic_stitches.html http://home.clara.net/hutchal/curtains/sewguide.htm Get a scrap of material, and while you are watching a favorite show, try some of these. You need to practice so that you can use the stitches when you need them. Traditionally, they won't be pretty at first, but after a few stitches, you will get the hang of it! Impress you family and friends! It is surprising how much people marvel when you can quickly fix a garment.....because many of them have never seen it done. Increase your self-reliance skills while showing your family and the Lord that you are thankful for the goodness that you have been blessed with. Stitch away....Today!

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Fun diy-projects, crafts, tips, experience the joy of doing it yourself!Official ChannelSewing tutorial video, sewing hacks, sewing tips, embroidery hacksHom...

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04.20.2016 0845 Although I do enjoy using a sewing machine to stitch together projects, I initially learned how to hand sew as a child. Hand sewing isn’t as daunting as it sounds, alth…

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Essential Hand Sewing Stitches. Running Stitch. Backstitch. Blanket Stitch. Whip Stitch. Cross Stitch. Pickstitch. Catchstitch. Invisible Stitch

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A fantastic guide to the Basic Hand Stitches for Beginners.If you are learning to sew or teaching someone to sew,this is an excellent guide to sewing basics

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Packing for a holiday can be exciting as you imagine the wonderful times you’ll be sharing with those soon-to-be-jet-setting outfits, but it can also border on traumatic if you get yourself into a …

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I'm making a jacket which calls for non-functional buttons over snaps and since the garment will be worn such that the male side of the snaps may show, I really wanted to cover them. I couldn't use the standard method for applying the self fabric (gathering the fabric behind the snap with a running stitch) because my fabric (heavyweight water-resistant twill) is way too thick. As a matter of fact, the fabric was so thick that I couldn't cover both halves of the snap pair, so I opted to leave the female side uncovered, since it wasn't going to show anyhow. Here's a clean and easy way to cover the male part of a snap if you have some heavy-weight fabric. So first off, trace the snap half on the back of a fabric scrap. Use a small punch to create a tiny hole right in the center of the circle, as a place to start cutting with tiny scissors. Carefully cut around the starting circle to expand it to just smaller than the "male" part of the male snap. This might take a trial or two--you don't want it too big, and too small is no good either. Apply Fray-Check liberally to the back and front side of the hole edge keeps it from fraying to bits. Then, cut around the original drawn circle. The amount to cut beyond the drawn circle will vary a bit, based on the size of the snap. A good place to start is about half the diameter of the snap. This snap is a bit less than 1" and I extended the circle by about 3/8". The male part of the snap can then be pushed through the hole, even before the Fray-Check dries, since Fray-Check stiffens the fabric. Flip the snap over and begin cutting triangles out of the edge of the circle, stopping 1/8" from your drawn circle. More triangles means a smoother edge around your snap when you draw the fabric underneath, so don't be quick to finish! Apply Fray-Check around all the cut edges of your little gear :) Once the Fray-Check dries, begin sewing the fabric underneath the snap. Start by inserting your needle into one "gear tooth" from the underside. Then, insert the needle through a gear tooth on the opposite side of the snap. Continue going from one side to the other drawing the teeth together (kind of like a corset), pulling the threads tightly as you go. Done! This method is more time-consuming for sure, but results in a beautiful finished snap, without a huge amount of bulk underneath. As I mentioned, I didn't cover the female side of the snap, but a similar method could be used. Thanks for stopping by! In the next few days, I'll reveal my lovely green jacket with half-covered snaps! P.S. I wanted to share one of my Christmas gifts--an adorable punch felted pin cushion from Foxtail Creek Studio. How sweet is that? Those trees remind of the truffula trees from The Lorax! Thank you to my family for finding such a gorgeous addition to my sewing room!

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