Scientific american magazine

Collection by Marie Pham

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Marie Pham
What Is An“Atmospheric River”? It flooded parts of California in then Texas in [Illustration by Don Foley, for Scientific American] Note, this "River in the Sky" shifted south in hitting Texas and Colorado. A warming Pacific suggests more events to come. Earth And Space Science, Earth From Space, Science And Nature, Teaching Science, Science Education, Science And Technology, Forensic Science, Life Science, Higher Education

What Is This “Atmospheric River” That Is Flooding California?

What Is This “Atmospheric River” That Is Flooding California? [Illustration by Don Foley, for Scientific American]

The Mind-Boggling Math of Migratory Beekeeping 31 billion honeybees plus acres of almond trees equals 700 billion almonds—and one.

The Mind-Boggling Math of Migratory Beekeeping

31 billion honeybees plus 810,000 acres of almond trees equals 700 billion almonds—and one looming agricultural crisis

2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology: Transport Vesicles (colored spheres) abound in cells [Illustration by Tomo Narashima; From "Budding Vesicles in Living Cells" by James E. Rothman and Lelio Orci, Scientific American, March High School Science, Science For Kids, Life Science, Science And Technology, Teaching Cells, Teaching Biology, Cell Biology, Ap Biology, Scientific American Magazine

Researchers Win Nobel for Cell Transport System

Transport Vesicles (colored spheres) abound in cells [Illustration by Tomo Narashima; From "Budding Vesicles in Living Cells" by James E. Rothman and Lelio Orci, Scientific American, March 1996]

Science infographic The Petri Dish Platter [Illustration by Emily Cooper originally produced for Inside the Meat Lab by Jeffrey Bartholet Scientific American Magazine June Life Science, Science Nature, Biology Poster, Scientific American Magazine, Health Site, Petri Dish, Animal Science, Information Graphics, Science And Technology

Cultured Beef: Do We Really Need a $380,000 Burger Grown in Petri Dishes?

For the first time, the public has been treated to the spectacle of lab-grown meat cooked and eaten via live Webcast. Backed by Google billionaire Sergey Brin, Dutch tissue engineer Mark Post unveiled his “cultured beef” at a press event on August 5, answering the question posed by a 2011 Scientific American feature: “When Will [...]

We all know too much caffeine is bad for us but, if you are anything like me, it’s difficult to know how much you are drinking and even more difficult to reduce it. At least this infographic …

Caffeine High: More and More Products Contain Large Doses

More and more products contain more and more caffeine

Well, this should be interesting. stay tuned for the operation later this month! Costa Concordia Salvage Plan: Flip the Ship and Float It Away [Illustration by Don Foley; for "Raising the Wreck" by Barbie Latza Nadeau;

Refloating the Wrecked Costa Concordia Cruise Ship Could Ruin Marine Sanctuary

Costa Concordia Salvage Plan: Flip the Ship and Float It Away [Illustration by Don Foley; for "Raising the Wreck" by Barbie Latza Nadeau; Scientific American, August 2013]

Life Early years Albert Camus was born on 7 November 1913 in Dréan. Camus, Albert was a series of essays by Albert Camus that were serialized Science Area, Science And Nature, Thematic Analysis, Scientific American Magazine, Essay Writing Help, Summer Science, Peer Pressure, Essay Examples, New Things To Learn

Different Research Papers Score Big with Scientists and the Public

Different Research Papers Score Big with Scientists and the Public [Graphic by Jan Willem Tulp, for Scientific American; SOURCE: Altmetric]

Scientific American Magazine Cover Janary 2014 by André Kutscherauer, via Behance Embodied Cognition, Scientific American Magazine, Degrees Of Freedom, Citizen Science, Scientific Method, Negative Emotions, Trauma, Behavior, Psychology

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Out on newsstands (and in my mailbox) is the second issue of Scientific American André Kutscherauer illustrated the cover for (check out the first here).

A Planetary Double Take [Illustration by Mark A. SOURCE: NASA/JPL-Caltech/K. Stevenson University of Central Florida (secondary eclipse brightness data); for "The Dawn of Distant Skies" by Michael D. Stevenson University, Scientific American Magazine, Space Map, Signs Of Life, High School Science, Information Graphics, Our Solar System, Double Take, Central Florida

Astronomers Search for Signs of Life in the Skies of Distant Exoplanets

A Planetary Double Take [Illustration by Mark A. Garlick; SOURCE: NASA/JPL-Caltech/K. Stevenson University of Central Florida (secondary eclipse brightness data); for "The Dawn of Distant Skies" by Michael D. Lemonick, Scientific American, July 2013]

MADE IN CHINA? [Graphic by Pitch Interactive; for "The Truth about China’s Patent Boom" By Lee Branstetter, Guangwei Li and Francisco Veloso, Scientific American, October Science News, Data Science, Life Science, Disruptive Innovation, Innovation Strategy, Data Visualization Software, Scientific American Magazine, Information Graphics, Design Strategy

The Truth about China’s Patent Boom

Why China's surge in international patents marks the emergence of a new, international form of research and development

Volume 509 Issue 8 May 2014

Volume 509 Issue 7499, 8 May 2014

In little more than a decade synthetic biology — building on the foundations of genetic engineering — has developed into a multifaceted field with exciting and sometimes controversial potential. Tools now being developed enable the redesign of existing, natural biological systems to perform specific tasks, and the design and construction of new biological systems with capabilities beyond those achieved in the natural world. Cover: Thomas Porostocky.