Preston Sturges

Collection by Maureen

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Writer, director, producer of some of my all time favourite films.

Maureen
Barbara Stanwyck and Henry Fonda

Nick ? Nicky ?

Bianca. 'Old hollywood, old hollywood and...old hollywood 24/7' is my motto This is pretty much a vintage blawg ( sometimes I just forget about it). I really really luv tonssss of people nel, and a...

Joel McCrea and Veronica Lake in Sullivan’s Travels (Preston Sturges, 1941)

We Had Faces Then

A gay man of a certain age and a certain sensibility searching for meaning in the flickering images...

Stars of "The Palm Beach Story" - Joel McCrea, Mary Astor, Claudette Colbert, Rudy Vallee

Miss Carousel: Photo

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Veronica Lake and Joel McCrea on the set of Sullivan’s Travels (Preston Sturges, 1942)

We Had Faces Then

Veronica Lake and Joel McCrea on the set of Sullivan’s Travels (Preston Sturges, 1942)

Veronica Lake and Joel McCrea publicity still for "Sullivan's Travels"

Veronica Lake and Joel McCrea publicity still for "Sullivan's Travels"

"The Sin of Harold Diddlebock," 1947, Harold Lloyd and Lion co-star

Mad Wednesday (aka The Sin of Harold Diddlebock) (1947)

Written by director Preston Sturges to lure Harold Lloyd out of retirement, "Mad Wednesday" (also released as "The Sin of Harold Diddlebock" in some areas) is a unique film in that it's the sound sequel to a silent comedy, Lloyd's 1925 film, "The Freshman". It's 20 years later and the unlikely college football hero is quietly working a desk job as a clerk, while also carrying a crush for a lovely female co-worker, daydreaming about marrying her. But he's fired from his job and his romantic…

Sullivan's Travels--Veronica Lake, Joel McCrea

Sullivan's Travels--Veronica Lake, Joel McCrea

Preston Sturges

The Seven Wonders of Preston Sturges

Preston Sturges’s life was as turbulently unpredictable as his movies, which resonated with W.W. II America—and still hold up today.