Akmal Ritaudin
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Nahawa Doumbia

Nahawa Doumbia

Andre Levins

Andre Levins

Metallica

Metallica

Katy Perry and John Mayer in February

Katy Perry and John Mayer in February

Black Sabbath

Black Sabbath

Rolling Stones Glastonbury Festival Debut Draws Rave Reviews From Critics

Rolling Stones Glastonbury Festival Debut Draws Rave Reviews From Critics

Ian Gillan, Deep Purple

Ian Gillan, Deep Purple

'A Night With Janis Joplin' to Play Broadway

'A Night With Janis Joplin' to Play Broadway

Alphorn - Alpenhorn or alphorn, a wind instrument, consisting of a natural wooden horn of conical bore, having a cup-shaped mouthpiece, used by mountaineers in Switzerland and elsewhere.  The tube is made of thin strips of birchwood soaked in water until they have become quite pliable; they are then wound into a tube of conical form from 4 to 8 ft. long, and neatly covered with bark. A cup-shaped mouthpiece carved out of a block of hard wood is added and the instrument is complete.

Alphorn - Alpenhorn or alphorn, a wind instrument, consisting of a natural wooden horn of conical bore, having a cup-shaped mouthpiece, used by mountaineers in Switzerland and elsewhere. The tube is made of thin strips of birchwood soaked in water until they have become quite pliable; they are then wound into a tube of conical form from 4 to 8 ft. long, and neatly covered with bark. A cup-shaped mouthpiece carved out of a block of hard wood is added and the instrument is complete.

Shakuhachi (尺八) is a Japanese flute which is end-blown and held vertically like a recorder instead of being held transversely like the familiar Western transverse flute. A recorder player blows into a duct, also called "fipple," and thus has little or no control over the tuned pitch. The shakuhachi player blows as one would blow across the top of an empty bottle, but the opposite edge of the shakuhachi has a sharp edge, allowing the player substantial pitch control.

Shakuhachi (尺八) is a Japanese flute which is end-blown and held vertically like a recorder instead of being held transversely like the familiar Western transverse flute. A recorder player blows into a duct, also called "fipple," and thus has little or no control over the tuned pitch. The shakuhachi player blows as one would blow across the top of an empty bottle, but the opposite edge of the shakuhachi has a sharp edge, allowing the player substantial pitch control.