Threads of Life textiles in detail

Each textile has a story- where it's from, who made it, and what materials were used. If you are interested in the process and details of these textiles, this board is for you!
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Ikat Sarung from Savu, Indonesia. Cotton, natural dyes (2009) - Threads of Life. Marsala, dark red, black, geometric motif

Ikat Sarung from Savu, Indonesia. Cotton, natural dyes - Threads of Life

Rangrang - Ceremonial Shoulder Cloth (2006) from Threads of Life.  Woven by Ni Nyoman Seru of Ampel Village, Nusa Penida, Bali

Our Textile: Rangrang - Ceremonial Shoulder Cloth - Threads of Life Woven by Ni Nyoman Seru of Ampel Village Nusa Penida

After five years, the weavers of Ina Tula Tani have revived the tradition of weaving their natural dyed kreot nai juan textiles in Tapobal, Lembata

After five years, the weavers of Ina Tula Tani have revived the tradition of weaving their natural dyed kreot nai juan textiles in Tapobal, Lembata on Bali, Indonesia

Lau Pahudu Hada tube sarong with silver ornamentation from Rindi in Sumba

Our Textile: Lau Hemba Kiku Kawadak - Ceremonial Tubular Skirt - Threads of Life

Ei Pudi Wodatu from Rai Jua near Savu- dark indigo.

Ei Pudi Wodatu from Rai Jua near Savu- dark indigo.

Unique religious traditions have developed in every corner of West Timor. Each clan maintains a holy spring and a sacred location. The clans also identify themselves with a particular plant and animal, which they honor with ceremonies and sacrifices. Clan members never eat their sacred animal, and adorn their homes and their artwork with its image. Artist Blandina Feot belongs to a clan protected by the python, and her work features her clan motif, called umek poat, or snakeskin.

Timor - Threads of Life

Detail of a Marilotong textile from West Sulawesi

Detail of a Marilotong textile from West Sulawesi

Detail from Threads of Life textile (Granturismo)

Threads of Life is a fair trade business in Ubud that sells exquisite, ethically produced Balinese textiles and crafts, such as beautiful baskets.

Weaver Getreda Obehetan embellished this cloth with subtle accents in sotis, a floating warp technique common in the Amarasi region. The locals call this motif of interlocking hooks kaimanfafa. Getreda Obehetan made her dyes from local forest plants. She extracted the red pigment from the crushed roots of the morinda tree. Morinda red binds to cotton only in the presence of a mixture of other plants and minerals called a mordant.

Weaver Getreda Obehetan embellished this cloth with subtle accents in sotis, a floating warp technique common in the Amarasi region. The locals call this motif of interlocking hooks kaimanfafa. Getreda Obehetan made her dyes from local forest plants. She extracted the red pigment from the crushed roots of the morinda tree. Morinda red binds to cotton only in the presence of a mixture of other plants and minerals called a mordant.

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