UTARI NOVINDRA

UTARI NOVINDRA

UTARI NOVINDRA
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KKK members walk the streets

An African American woman watches as robed Ku Klux Klansmen walk in downtown Montgomery, Alabama, prior to a cross burning rally that night, November

Lina Medina is the youngest confirmed mother in medical history, giving birth at the age of five years, seven months and 17 days. From a remote village in Peru, in 1939 Medina was brought to a hospital by her parents due to increasing abdominal size. She was originally thought to have had a tumor, but her doctors determined she was in her seventh month of pregnancy.

Lina Medina is the youngest confirmed mother in medical history, giving birth at the age of five years, seven months and 17 days. From a remote village in Peru, in 1939

I found my mummy; what about you?

LONDON, WORLD WAR II: Southend, Essex, Photograph: Science & Society Picture Library scary as it is, gas masks were probably worn pretty often.

The mother is ashamed and needs to hide her face

An ashamed mother puts her four children up for sale in Chicago. Many people were forced into rather bizarre circumstances, such as Mr. Chalifoux, as they faced eviction and struggled to put food on the table. case for humanity & the lack thereof

This memento mori photo contains not a single deceased person, yet it feels more powerful than many of the post mortem images   The stark simplicity is breathtaking. And that little boy’s determined face, wearing his father’s uniform cap

This memento mori photo contains not a single deceased person, yet it feels more powerful than many of the postmortem images. The stark simplicity is breathtaking, and that little boy’s determined face, wearing his father’s uniform cap

Buried on Page B1, alongside the hum-drum headline “KKK march calm,” a powerful image of race relations in the southern United States was nearly lost. In fact, it almost wasn’t published at all.   And in the 20 years since, this emotionally complex photograph of a Klan-robed toddler playfully touching the riot shield of a bemused African-American state trooper has gone uncelebrated and largely unknown.  (No one is born a bigot . . .)

A small white boy touches the riot shield of a black state trooper at a Ku Klux Klan rally in Atlanta, Georgia, 1992 Hard to believe this was taken Raising children in hate.